SDEWES Index

Benchmarking the performance of cities across metrics related to energy, water and environment systems presents an opportunity to trigger policy learning, action, and cooperation to bring cities closer to sustainable development. The Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems (SDEWES) Index benchmarks cities based on 7 dimensions, 35 main indicators, and about 25 sub-indicators. The namesake of the Index is the SDEWES Centre and Conference series that encourage a multi-disciplinary approach to the issues and challenges of sustainable development. Cities with well-rounded and above average performances in multiple dimensions score higher in the SDEWES Index and take place in higher quartiles of the sample.

City Sample

The SDEWES Index is currently applied to 120 cities, which correspond to samples of South East European cities, Mediterranean port cities, and other cities around the world based on multiple criteria to increase geographical diversity and the representation of cities of presenting authors. Such a sample, which has been developed through six different SDEWES Conferences, includes cities from Europe as well as Africa, Asia, and the Americas. In total, 88% of the cities are signatories to the Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy while other cities are integrated into the sample based on data availability. The data of the cities in the sample are renewed with the release of new monitoring reports by the cities as well as updates in the main data sources.

Dimensions

The 7 dimensions that define the SDEWES Index are overviewed below. Each dimension contains the normalized values of 5 main indicators, all of which are aggregated into an index value. Winsorization is applied to any outliers in the dataset as identified based on higher order moments. The maximum possible score in any dimension and the overall index is a score of 50.000 while the performance of an average city receives a score of 28.441 as summarized here.

  • Energy Usage and Climate (D1)

    The “Energy Usage and Climate” dimension represents the present state of urban energy usage, including in residential, tertiary, and municipal buildings, private/public transport and the municipal vehicle fleet. The magnitude of energy usage measures the impact of cities on energy spending to satisfy energy services. Energy usage per capita places energy spending in the context of population. The total heating and cooling degree-days are used to adjust urban energy usage with climate. The final to primary energy ratio represents the overall efficiency in the energy system. + Click here to see the indicators

  • Penetration of Energy and CO2 Saving Measures (D2)

    The dimension on “Penetration of Energy and CO2 Saving Measures” scores the status of measures to reduce urban energy spending and CO2 emissions. These include urban energy system characteristics, such as the share of district heating and/or cooling based on combined heat and power and any progress towards lower temperature networks. Such measures enable the better use the quality of energy resources (exergy). Other indicators include energy savings in end-usage, including net-zero buildings and districts, the density of the public transport network based on the total length of urban rail per square kilometer as well as the presence of decentralized measures, such as bicycle sharing, and efficient public lighting armatures.
    + Click here to see the indicators

  • Renewable Energy Potential and Utilization (D3)

    The “Renewable Energy Potential and Utilization” dimension considers the solar energy, wind energy, and geothermal energy potential of the city and the utilization of this potential to produce useful energy output, particularly electricity. The utilization of renewable energy is also assessed based on the share of green energy in transport, including biofuels that need to be obtained in a sustainable manner and electricity. To excel in this dimension, a city with a relatively higher renewable energy potential also needs to have a higher share of renewable energy usage in the energy mix. + Click here to see the indicators

  • Water Usage and Environmental Quality (D4)

    The “Water Usage and Environmental Quality” dimension brings together indicators that relate to domestic blue water consumption per capita, water quality, and local air quality based on annual mean particulate matter measured at PM10. The indicators on ecological footprint and biocapacity per capita are taken from available data at the national, regional, or city level. Such indicators place the city in the context of any ecological deficit or reserve that can affect environmental quality.
    + Click here to see the indicators

  • CO2 Emissions and Industrial Profile (D5)

    The dimension on “CO2 Emissions and Industrial Profile” quantifies the CO2 emissions in the city and the average CO2 intensity of the energy mix, which can be minimized based on energy systems with greater shares of renewable energy. Energy-intense sectors that are included in EU ETS are surveyed to determine the industrial profile of the city if any. For a broader scope, the airport servicing the city is assessed based on passenger traffic, carbon accreditation, and renewable energy measures.
    + Click here to see the indicators

  • Urban Planning and Social Welfare (D6)

    The “Urban Planning and Social Welfare” dimension puts forth aspects that are related to waste and wastewater management, compact urban form and green spaces, as well as economic and educational opportunities and well-being towards a thriving citizenry. The sub-indicators include the recycling and compositing share, compliance with the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive, the share of impermeable surface area, and sprawl that requires urban planning to limit land-use changes.
    + Click here to see the indicators

  • R&D, Innovation and Sustainability Policy (D7)

    The “R&D, Innovation and Sustainability Policy” dimension has a cross-cutting scope that couples the ambitions of the city to reduce CO2 emissions by the targeted year and the capacities that are made available to local actors to create solutions. This includes R&D spending as a ratio of GDP, priorities in energy, environment and smart cities, patents with European Patent Office green patent codes, the number of universities and institutions that are located in the city and included in the Scimago top 1000 institution rankings, and the h-index of scientific publications. + Click here to see the indicators

Implementation, Results and Best Practices: SDEWES City Index Atlas

The synthesis of data from the 120 cities around the world for the 35 main indicators involves 4,200 inputs that are mapped spatially in a SDEWES Index Atlas. The atlas identifies the cities that take place in certain quartiles of the 7 dimensions and maps the normalized scores that are obtained. The Plenary Lecture on “Benchmarking the Sustainability of Urban Energy, Water and Environment Systems with the SDEWES City Index and Envisioning Scenarios for the Future” at the 12th SDEWES Conference provides the atlas mapping. The related sections are also downloadable here that contains best practice examples based on quartile performances.


SDEWES Index Interactive Table

According to the results of the SDEWES Index, the lower 25% of the sample is characterized to contain the “Challenged Cities” that face challenges in multiple dimensions. The cities that take place in the second quartile at the lower 25-50% of the sample continue to be in need for strategic approaches to address remaining challenges, namely “Solution Seeking Cities.” Above the median value, the “Transitioning Cities” are characterized to have certain strengths at the top 50-75% of the sample while the “Pioneering Cities” have strengths in multiple dimensions based on a performance at the top 25% of all cities. These results are summarized in the interactive tables below.

Lower 25% of the Cities: Challenged Cities

City D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 Index %∆M Chart Rank
Tianjin 13.698 21.833 14.767 23.521 1.667 16.090 30.695 15.277 -47.4 120
Beijing 16.532 32.500 16.522 22.140 1.903 18.253 30.695 17.433 -40.0 119
Cape Town 19.586 14.667 23.539 26.691 6.476 21.790 18.009 17.446 -39.9 118
Johannesburg 20.641 13.667 16.734 19.993 13.221 18.972 19.935 17.479 -39.8 117
Athens 21.495 18.667 27.139 25.932 11.269 23.579 20.158 20.125 -30.7 116
Istanbul * 25.372 11.667 21.687 25.133 18.673 13.269 24.609 20.544 -29.3 115
Nagoya 16.759 38.000 18.840 25.605 7.176 26.927 32.134 20.999 -27.7 114
Bogotá 27.452 26.333 15.786 27.393 21.008 19.157 12.930 22.112 -23.9 113
Bangalore 29.627 18.500 15.692 26.179 27.054 9.159 22.037 22.839 -21.4 112
Washington D.C. 18.687 29.333 17.579 21.493 20.417 29.437 30.159 22.870 -21.3 111
Zenica 36.288 22.000 16.561 24.095 28.615 9.047 6.272 23.219 -20.1 110
Batna 37.271 18.667 16.921 17.890 31.480 10.690 10.600 23.722 -18.3 109
Lviv 34.609 29.333 11.716 24.599 27.207 15.191 14.841 24.470 -15.8 108
Sarajevo 33.194 28.333 15.393 28.008 30.642 12.232 9.129 24.617 -15.3 107
Sfax 39.483 18.667 21.351 21.635 32.081 13.191 5.342 24.960 -14.1 106
Belgrade 31.023 23.333 18.938 32.402 24.741 16.539 21.677 24.996 -14.0 105
Warsaw 29.522 40.000 16.319 30.137 15.873 28.369 20.477 25.165 -13.4 104
São Paulo 25.543 17.167 32.799 39.594 20.700 19.151 26.393 25.290 -12.9 103
Incheon 24.992 42.667 15.909 21.172 18.431 30.587 31.346 25.388 -12.6 102
London 14.459 46.667 17.605 31.644 15.858 35.874 37.754 25.477 -12.3 101
Berlin 20.842 46.667 18.406 30.426 11.153 35.121 37.871 25.769 -11.3 100
Rio de Janeiro 30.399 17.167 34.494 37.420 18.455 19.169 27.465 25.981 -10.6 99
Ostrava 37.366 28.333 18.755 19.597 25.611 26.193 14.159 26.003 -10.5 98
Bijeljina 35.052 22.000 20.071 32.380 34.585 10.566 9.074 26.021 -10.4 97
Skopje 37.806 33.000 17.995 19.149 27.305 19.747 13.622 26.089 -10.2 96
Salé 40.571 20.667 20.140 30.476 29.029 8.468 14.902 26.129 -10.1 95
Antalya 33.505 30.333 24.151 26.206 26.422 17.294 18.212 26.301 -9.5 94
Cologne 21.375 44.667 21.600 30.376 19.043 31.678 31.167 26.649 -8.3 93
Sofia 30.995 36.000 19.847 30.115 25.619 20.933 19.794 26.701 -8.1 92
Christchurch 24.386 29.000 20.947 33.188 31.096 31.286 16.698 26.873 -7.5 91

Lower 25-50% of the Cities: Solution Seeking Cities

City D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 Index %∆M Chart Rank
Bydgoszcz 34.994 24.000 15.364 29.869 27.548 29.312 17.707 26.897 -7.4 90
Podgorica 38.072 25.333 18.538 34.051 32.422 13.986 9.325 27.025 -7.0 89
Eskişehir Tepebaşı 37.341 23.667 22.822 28.978 29.924 14.449 18.569 27.105 -6.7 88
Hamburg 22.602 44.667 20.819 30.903 19.764 31.495 32.992 27.243 -6.2 87
Tirana 41.220 19.667 24.959 30.779 32.511 11.492 10.314 27.326 -5.9 86
Rome 24.958 34.667 23.796 28.147 28.487 28.313 24.547 27.349 -5.9 85
Thessaloniki 35.515 36.333 19.448 29.820 24.576 25.184 14.658 27.374 -5.8 84
Bursa Nilüfer 37.806 20.667 21.412 27.755 31.801 18.997 17.902 27.432 -5.6 83
Bratislava 32.392 36.000 21.795 29.104 27.391 25.460 14.795 27.463 -5.5 82
Timișoara 38.093 29.333 16.814 31.421 30.387 20.292 12.543 27.591 -5.0 81
Antwerp 29.779 32.667 21.506 25.131 29.141 31.201 21.123 27.739 -4.5 80
Madrid 27.902 38.000 26.115 29.786 24.700 29.267 21.445 27.759 -4.4 79
Tallinn 32.552 40.667 13.521 36.587 26.208 27.211 14.758 27.854 -4.1 78
Niš 37.294 26.333 21.490 33.406 32.113 13.625 17.257 27.975 -3.7 77
Brașov 40.368 26.333 17.673 32.016 28.378 22.824 14.852 28.035 -3.5 76
Cluj-Napoca 39.584 28.333 20.021 31.511 29.746 20.442 13.257 28.140 -3.1 75
Gdynia 36.473 22.000 18.914 32.896 29.942 29.222 16.905 28.169 -3.0 74
Paris 21.157 46.667 19.728 28.452 27.128 30.079 33.699 28.283 -2.6 73
Florence 34.788 26.000 22.380 28.606 30.756 25.826 20.976 28.384 -2.3 72
Burgas 33.879 33.000 20.061 31.353 32.954 22.318 15.103 28.444 -2.1 71
Volos 36.520 28.667 26.901 28.052 31.078 23.517 13.761 28.536 -1.8 70
Sevilla 34.520 29.333 28.344 28.153 28.131 25.349 20.231 28.584 -1.6 69
Nitra 37.690 26.333 21.432 29.220 34.135 23.318 12.517 28.589 -1.6 68
Kalamariá 38.228 26.333 19.254 29.820 32.766 23.517 15.547 28.593 -1.6 67
Varna 35.790 32.000 18.552 28.875 33.581 22.875 16.175 28.652 -1.4 66
Constanța 39.244 23.000 23.328 29.976 35.238 20.370 11.471 28.674 -1.3 65
Birmingham 29.474 41.667 14.588 33.502 24.589 33.381 27.967 28.810 -0.8 64
Murcia 35.766 26.333 25.214 28.605 29.840 29.096 18.231 28.814 -0.8 63
Funchal 36.557 18.667 21.884 31.842 35.983 24.170 18.452 28.976 -0.3 62
Bilbao 36.914 26.000 18.356 29.659 31.687 28.936 20.318 29.021 -0.1 61

Top 50-75% of the Cities: Transitioning Cities

City D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 Index %∆M Chart Rank
Patras 36.954 29.667 22.863 26.764 34.032 26.851 12.873 29.078 0.1 60
Heraklion 36.924 26.333 25.018 29.587 32.785 25.184 15.896 29.127 0.3 59
Genoa 35.362 41.667 22.180 29.083 25.823 26.193 21.286 29.259 0.7 58
Pisa 34.460 27.333 26.852 28.839 34.189 21.840 21.063 29.299 0.9 57
Zaragoza 34.428 42.667 23.139 30.073 27.486 25.823 17.739 29.304 0.9 56
Budapest 30.624 46.667 18.776 33.752 29.088 23.629 22.059 29.380 1.1 55
Porto 34.572 20.667 27.932 31.122 30.823 27.533 26.285 29.422 1.3 54
Bornova 37.633 31.333 28.543 26.902 32.619 15.766 21.514 29.478 1.5 53
Bologna 34.404 34.000 16.449 28.786 34.524 27.487 20.619 29.516 1.6 52
Pula 36.775 29.667 21.631 34.645 33.480 20.803 18.464 29.597 1.9 51
Dublin 31.803 32.667 19.350 33.515 29.765 35.224 22.816 29.656 2.1 50
Málaga 35.617 32.667 24.450 28.486 33.128 25.813 17.516 29.663 2.1 49
Zadar 39.186 26.333 19.841 34.724 34.242 20.656 18.107 29.709 2.3 48
Milan 32.637 40.000 18.546 26.802 33.590 26.225 23.476 29.752 2.4 47
Kranj 36.539 24.000 17.717 32.019 38.443 27.366 16.492 29.797 2.6 46
Turin 36.401 46.667 17.477 26.355 26.198 27.978 23.913 29.799 2.6 45
Celje 38.337 25.333 19.228 31.232 35.835 26.386 17.206 29.834 2.7 44
Glasgow 30.897 39.333 17.065 32.803 27.605 35.228 28.594 30.012 3.3 43
Grand Lyon 25.250 44.667 25.402 28.948 32.106 30.815 26.160 30.030 3.4 42
Grenoble 32.657 32.667 22.490 28.624 30.982 30.920 28.779 30.110 3.6 41
Vila Nova de Gaia 34.145 20.667 28.500 31.723 36.921 26.014 21.840 30.138 3.7 40
Izola 38.136 23.667 18.205 32.780 36.672 30.767 16.849 30.289 4.3 39
Rijeka 40.086 29.667 18.125 33.950 34.687 21.492 19.178 30.316 4.4 38
Venice 35.520 31.667 17.709 28.218 36.757 29.167 21.643 30.380 4.6 37
Valencia 36.350 34.667 29.707 29.947 29.179 29.105 18.588 30.401 4.7 36
Naples 35.798 35.000 21.635 28.662 31.754 29.034 24.230 30.461 4.9 35
Sydney 32.478 38.333 22.931 32.548 23.532 35.251 33.009 30.475 4.9 34
Maribor 36.367 39.667 17.177 30.889 34.526 30.285 14.127 30.496 5.0 33
Karlovac 40.278 23.000 22.895 32.624 36.907 23.663 17.885 30.591 5.3 32
Frankfurt 29.466 44.667 22.026 30.030 26.947 32.649 33.254 30.594 5.3 31

Top 25% of the Cities: Pioneering Cities

City D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 Index %∆M Chart Rank
Braga 35.997 22.000 26.905 33.153 37.346 27.533 18.586 30.595 5.3 30
Pécs 38.027 34.000 20.842 33.509 34.045 25.636 17.091 30.655 5.5 29
Bari 36.995 30.667 26.254 28.693 31.950 27.083 25.024 30.687 5.6 28
Vilnius 38.971 32.667 16.005 35.968 33.922 27.663 17.499 30.704 5.7 27
Ljubljana 35.587 40.667 18.098 31.976 29.328 33.012 23.159 30.797 6.0 26
Bucharest ** 38.125 45.667 23.530 30.959 31.101 18.180 20.217 30.852 6.2 25
Velenje 38.418 33.000 17.150 32.606 36.562 28.190 16.937 30.947 6.5 24
Ohrid 39.492 27.000 18.544 35.905 39.854 26.602 11.170 30.965 6.6 23
Barcelona 31.842 46.667 30.480 28.208 29.704 28.056 22.112 30.966 6.6 22
Riga 38.886 36.000 21.287 37.363 30.208 24.972 20.700 31.025 6.8 21
Leuven 32.582 37.333 22.925 25.351 39.048 30.884 20.139 31.114 7.1 20
Osijek 38.748 34.000 25.272 31.530 35.136 22.253 18.686 31.134 7.2 19
Amsterdam 29.422 43.333 20.952 29.396 30.945 37.272 30.281 31.311 7.8 18
Seferihisar 39.549 23.000 29.809 31.242 40.514 19.100 18.077 31.344 7.9 17
Karşıyaka 38.514 28.333 28.627 30.879 39.500 15.766 23.736 31.556 8.6 16
Lisbon 33.307 45.667 31.348 32.668 30.807 24.769 21.444 31.587 8.7 15
Zagreb 34.569 44.667 24.620 31.191 32.120 25.440 24.893 31.606 8.8 14
Dubrovnik 37.390 29.667 25.084 35.053 37.856 26.139 20.821 31.972 10.1 13
Nice 32.874 34.667 24.218 28.382 40.020 31.961 27.136 32.465 11.8 12
Vienna 32.677 46.667 28.147 27.690 30.102 37.471 27.502 32.561 12.1 11
Reykjavík 36.370 36.333 32.076 29.213 37.491 36.468 17.908 33.333 14.7 10
Aalborg 32.613 34.000 26.958 31.432 37.095 39.744 28.920 33.378 14.9 9
Klagenfurt 39.852 33.000 26.699 28.128 33.580 36.945 28.867 33.454 15.2 8
Bregenz 40.042 29.667 28.684 28.778 37.709 34.289 23.931 33.494 15.3 7
Gothenburg 28.007 42.667 29.294 37.323 35.612 39.107 27.023 33.572 15.6 6
Århus 36.839 46.000 26.056 31.920 30.845 36.098 30.746 34.049 17.2 5
Espoo 38.568 39.667 20.650 39.802 36.313 36.931 25.807 34.774 19.7 4
Helsinki 36.462 43.333 26.055 39.802 36.486 35.265 27.680 35.348 21.7 3
Stockholm 31.151 50.000 31.500 36.104 38.004 39.031 29.563 36.007 24.0 2
Copenhagen 36.272 50.000 27.069 31.018 37.620 36.985 31.460 36.038 24.1 1

(*) 12 districts on the Thrace side
(**) District 1 with SEAP

City Pairings for Policy Learning

The SDEWES Index aims to support a “science of cities” through the comparison and ranking of city performance as well as a process of policy learning and collaboration towards attaining better levels of performance in the future. With this aim, a pattern search algorithm was applied to identify those cities that may have above/at or below the average city performance in the same dimension across all dimensions. In total, 20 pairs between 2 cities and 13 pairs between 3 or more cities were identified for a total of 33 pairs between 97 cities in the sample. Some of the city pairs had opposite patterns with other city pairs. The transfer of knowledge and experiences from the pioneering cities to the challenged cities can also trigger opportunities for collaboration.


Towards a SDEWES Aware City

Decision-makers are encouraged to use the results of the SDEWES Index to evaluate the overall score and dimension performance of a specific city and consider solutions that will improve the value of multiple indicators. Collaboration and taking integrated action by linking the urban energy, water and environment systems are a key aspect of realizing a more sustainable city. The SDEWES Index provides ample opportunities to encourage cities in using energy resources rationally at the right amount, quality, and time towards 100% renewable energy systems, acting to preserve water resources, and seeking integration whenever possible to valorize limited natural resources in better respect of environmental balances. Is your city a “SDEWES Aware” City?


Possible Scenarios for the Future

A foresight of trends that will have an impact on cities indicates that the average city performance will dynamically increase over time. Cities have a crucial role in bending the curve of global CO2 emissions by the year 2020. In addition, the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda clearly delineates goals for sustainable cities and communities, renewable energy, clean water and sanitation, as well as climate action with implications for urban systems. A backcasting of the values of the best performing city to the average city by target years represents the presence of opportunities for rapid progress. Scenarios in which cities utilize a given share of the available residual heat and urban biowaste as put forth by the Heat Roadmap Europe Pan-European Thermal Atlas take place among examples of the numerous possibilities.

References

Kılkış, Ş., Composite index for benchmarking local energy systems of Mediterranean port cities, Energy, Vol. 92, No. 3, pp. 622-638, 2015. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2015.06.093

Kılkış, Ş., Sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems index for Southeast European cities, Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 130, pp. 222-234, 2016. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.07.121

Kılkış, Ş., Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES) Index for Policy Learning in Cities, International Journal on Innovation and Sustainable Development, (Article in Press), pp. 1-48.

Kılkış, Ş., Benchmarking South East European Cities with the Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems Index, Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (Article in Press), pp. 1-52. dx.doi.org/10.13044/j.sdewes.d5.0179

Kılkış, Ş., Benchmarking the Sustainability of Urban Energy, Water and Environment Systems with the SDEWES City Index and Envisioning Scenarios for the Future, Plenary Lecture at 12th SDEWES Conference, www.dubrovnik2017.sdewes.org/lectures.php#IL4

For inquiries and comments regarding the SDEWES Index, contact:
siir.kilkis@tubitak.gov.tr (Prof. Şiir KILKIŞ, SDEWES ISC Member)


SDEWES INDEX
Benchmarking the performance of cities across energy, water and environment systems
related metrics presents an opportunity to trigger policy learning, action, and cooperation to bring cities closer to sustainable development.


NEWS
Find more news on our NEWS page


  • „Energy Conversion and Management“ published a May 2017 Special Issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems“ published Volume 6, Issue 1 (for March 2018). Read more at the journal home page.

  • „Energy - The International Journal“ published a special issue dedicated to 2016 Conferences on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews“ published Volume 82, Part 2 (for February 2018), dedicated to SDEWES2016 Conference. Read more at the journal home page.

  • „Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems“ published Volume 5, Issue 4 (for December 2017). Read more at the journal home page.

  • „Journal of Environmental Management“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • SDEWES Centre has awarded the best graduate theses in the past academic year of Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture in the field of sustainable development of energy, water and the environment systems. A committee consisting of Prof. Nataša Markovska, Prof. Nikola Ružinski and Prof. Aleksander Zidanšek made a decision on the three best graduate theses and the best authors are Mario Majdandžić, Luka Pavlinek and Vanja Kušen. Best thesis author, Mario Majdandžić will receive a cash prize in the amount of 5,000 HRK and the other two authors will receive a fee waiver for one of SDEWES conferences in 2018. Congratulations!

  • „Energy, Sustainability and Society“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th Dubrovnik conference, held in Dubrovnik in 2013. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems“ published Volume 5, Issue 3 (for September 2017). Read more at the journal home page.

  • Project FosterREG - Second in the series of workshops "How to plan, finance and manage the projects with integrated energy efficiency measures in urban regeneration" took place in Osijek.
    Read more

  • „Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems“ published Volume 5, Issue 2 (for June 2017). Read more at the journal home page.

  • Project FosterREG - First in the series of workshops "How to plan, finance and manage the projects with integrated energy efficiency measures in urban regeneration" took place in Zagreb.
    Read more

  • „Journal Thermal Science“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Energy - The International Journal“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • The International Centre for Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES Centre) in cooperation with Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture conducts awarding of master’s theses in the field of sustainable development of energy, water and the environment of UNIZAG FSB students. All graduate students that have defended their thesis in academic year 2015/2016 are eligible for contest. Applications need to be sent by September 1st, 2016. Contest details are below.

  • SDEWES Centre has awarded the best graduate theses in the past academic year of Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture in the field of sustainable development of energy, water and the environment systems. A committee consisting of Prof. Nataša Markovska, Prof. Nikola Ružinski and Prof. Aleksander Zidanšek made a decision on the three best graduate theses and the best authors are Dominik Dominković, Nikola Matak and Karlo Kupres. They will be rewarded with a fee waiver for a SDEWES conference of their choice, and the best thesis author will also have fully paid transport costs and accommodation during the selected conference. Congratulations! Full decision is available here.

  • FosterREG website has been launched! FosterREG aims at enhancing public capacity at local, regional and national levels to plan, finance and manage integrated urban regeneration for sustainable energy uptake.

  • „Energy Conversion and Management“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • The International Centre for Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES Centre) in cooperation with Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture conducts awarding of master’s theses in the field of sustainable development of energy, water and the environment of UNIZAG FSB students. All graduate students that have defended their thesis in academic year 2014/2015 are eligible for contest. Applications need to be sent by September 1st, 2015. Contest details are below.

  • „Waste Management & Research“ published a special issue. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • World Academy of Art and Science published an invitation to the SDEWES2015 Conference in Dubrovnik.

  • Croatian portal Europski fondovi announced the SDEWES2015 Conference in Dubrovnik (in Croatian).

  • „Applied Energy“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th Dubrovnik conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Management of Environmental Quality“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th Dubrovnik conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • Out of top 5 downloaded Energy papers, 2 are from SDEWES special issues!

  • „International Journal of Sustainable Water and Environmental Systems“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th SDEWES conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Energy - The International Journal“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th SDEWES conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th Dubrovnik conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Journal Thermal Science“ published a special issue dedicated to 5th Dubrovnik conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.

  • „Applied Energy“ published a special issue dedicated to 8th SDEWES conference. See more SDEWES special issues in the journal here.